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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 47
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Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm EST
do. >> last month, epa administrator gina mccarthy testified before the house science committee on the agencies will science and technology activities. the committee examine the policy of transparency practices on clean air and water acts and hydraulic fracturing or cracking. we bring you that kerry now. i'm not [inaudible conversations] >> to commit inside space and technology will come to order. welcome, everyone to today's hearing entitled strengthening transparency and accountability within the environmental protection agency. we're going to recognize myself or fitness for a doping statement and then i'll recognize the ranking member for hers. the environmental protection agency like every other governmental institution should answer to the american people. everyone agrees we need to protect the environment, but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet epa's justification for regulation are cloaked in secrecy i asked. it appears the epa been a lot of stretches of science to justify its own object disappeared am
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
that we understand how to answer those issues effective from a science perspective, and in a way that continues to maintain the availability of inexpensive natural gas that strengths the economy as well as help us reduce air emission. >> i appreciate that. i think it seems like a reasonable response. someone who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 8:00pm EST
science in the world. we want to understand how life works at the detailed levels and apply that in terms of coming up with new insights to prevent and treat disease. >> we support tens of thousands of grants across the country conducted by the world's most cutting-edge scientist in the united states who are working on cancer, aids and other drugs. we are on a roll but there is a bit of an issue with the cuts. >> let's learn about the history. your roots date back to the late 1700s. but you were formed in 1887 as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? >> the current budget is about $29 billion. the number of people that work on the campus is about 17,000. most of the work is done by grants we give to the institutions across the country and globally. 85% is spent there in the universities where you are hearing about medical breakthroughs. >> how long have you been with nih? >> i came here 20 years ago, steve. asked to come lead the human genome project. in 2003, they laid out all three letters of the dna instruction book w
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 7:00am EST
in "the war on football" is i get the signs and i try to overcome the speculation with the science on the game and the stories behind the game. and the reality is that the perception that's been created by the mass media with football over the last two years is almost in every instance wrong. in some cases just 180° wrong. i got into this genesis of writing "the war on football" was a study that was put together by the national institutes for occupational safety and health. national institutes ofnational f occupational safety and health federal scientist. they put together last year, they looked at every nfl player who was pension vested who played in the league between 1959-1980. so guys like lawrence taylor and joe theismann and walter payton and dick butkus, all these guys, about 35 other players who played in the league in those 30 or so years. the reason they looked at these players is because there's a wide suspicion in the public that nfl players die young, that they died in the '50s, that the game takes such a toll on their bodies that their health outcomes are just absolu
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm EST
never do that. you don't destroy the science to get to the headline. >> you don't distort the science to get to the headline. it you want to follow more of that issue, i recommend an amicus brief. i was involved in with it with the professor in which we recruited a number of distinguished scientists. we could have used more. and attempted so simply explain what the relevant issues on court junk dna were. but the court used it in the opinion nonetheless. it's an interesting brief, and easily obtained so the idea of the scientific safe guards then was those being used were not revealing much more than identity. it was sort of the basic end of the brief as well. privacy laden use of dna. statutes can be changed. supreme court clearly rejected the view in king by saying that once the statutes are in place, we will give a presumption they are followed. what is left after king? one issue is the balancing work the same in cases that are not, quote, seriouses offense. at least four times in the king opinion you see the phrase serious offense never defined. is it descriptive? if it's vital to
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am EST
labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a histori
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:45pm EST
that increasingly powerful scientific explanations of natural regularities, what we call science, provide progressively compelling evidence against the claims of revealed religion as such. so the more science explains, it is thought, the less room there is for god. this view turns out to be the result of contingent and often unknowingly held metaphysical assumptions with immediate -- medieval roots the historical significance of these assumptions became unexpectedly important starting in the 17th 17th century because of the ways in which controversy in the reformation era unintentionally marginalized theological discourse about god in the natural word. that leaves scientific and fifth sol cal discower discough of trying to talk about god. in chapter 2, the protestant reformation are analyzed as the two mores important and related means by which attempts were made to ground truth claims by those who rejected immediate evil christianant. thatthat's has unintended pleasurisms based on the bible and reason. impasses and the rear familiar -- reformation era helped -- but historically, and empi
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
a decade or two of really getting the kind of science we needed to make that case and to understand the brain as being the basis of both normal and abnormal behavior. host: the president talking about the brain initiative, calling this the next major american project -- what is he talking about? guest: to put that into context, he was thinking about the last two great american projects in science. one was the apollo project to put a man on the moon. and then the human genome project. the next great american project is what he is calling the brain initiative. and that is an initiative that will involve several government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 1:10pm EST
journalistic science lacks reliable reference. of both popular and high literary culture to be the tumultuous commissioned of the virgin and modes of thought in the in antebellum period a and choreographed the three stretches completely. rather than read the the high renaissance to read those as burst by wide popular writing immediately with the perceived reality the results with the political point of view to reanimate the of the blind alley. and then the first instance with the social engagement of the practice but he does so while incorporating and modified critical forms. john browne did jacksonian america did each marked with the hard work of three big it always a pleasure to engage david on the page and each book richly informs the sense of their subjects collectively and david i am grateful for your work and a remarkable career that continues with undiminished vigor. thank you very much and i apologize for my departure. [applause] >> first things first congratulations i think the more remarkable thing that is beneath the amazon since it is 25 years ago you cannot have the willingness t
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 4:45pm EST
itself as a religion. on the other hand, builds itself a science. that's her scientology comes to. a technology that this is not really a pulley system. this is a step icepack guaranteed to succeed latter to spiritual unlike men. our ron hubbard had a perfect understanding of the human mind. if you follow these types, you will achieve a kind of enlightenment. god doesn't play a big role in scientology. there's a place for him. eight dynamics. i won't go into too much of the terminology. at the peak there's a place that's infinite, but not a clearly felt outlay. scientology will tell you you could be a southern baptist or jehovah's witnesses still be a scientologist. but a product that doesn't seem to be the case. people are urged away from other belief systems to be fully subscribers to scientology. >> he touched on the entertainers and you read a lot about that in the tabloids newspapers. i was wondering about their counterparts in the political scheme of things on both the national and state levels they are, how much influence do they have like the attorney general i think one t
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
with other universities is housed in education city and there are all sorts of those that are science and technologies and the term artificial island and there are all sorts of mechanisms to pursue modernity as defined by the government and all of this is pursued by construction projects and the importance of this is not just in changing the early infrastructure. but in tying the state and bringing within the orbit of the state in the employ of the state, qatari business and entrepreneurs in each of these cities that are being built, one city, for example, slightly north and within it, there is doha land. not too different from disneyland. there is something called doha land. in and all of these are construction development projects, few of which the business community is drawn into the business community orbiting the state and political stability is in many ways purchased. political stability is insured. so there's remarkable political stability, which ties the business community for example in kuwait to the state division in its pursuit of development and modernistic projects. last
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 12:00am EST
developments, in developments that include both science as well as the legal profession helping to decide which of these developments are great and how how can we best use them? one of the things i really enjoy about talking to groups of judges is that you have, this group has the collective wisdom to help figure out how we can use this information, use this information to its best possible purposes and of course to avoid any potential harmful outcomes so i would like to thank you for your attention this morning. i've a happy to address any questions. [applause] >> we have time for two or three questions. please come up to the microphones to the front and remember you will be immortalized on c-span. >> taking swabs and telling what your future medical problems are. how accurate are those predictions and is it worth the money? >> that is a great question. the question is about so-called direct consumer testing where you send a saliva sample into a company. they type your dna using what we call a dna chip and you get back a lot of information about your approximate ancestry and about your risk fo
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 4:30pm EST
a gun out of plastic. it was science fiction but in the last few years that science fiction has become a reality. 3-d printers, a technology overall that is miraculous. 3-d printers can create car parts at a much cheaper price, create a trachea for a baby so it can live. but they can also create plastic guns. and now technology allows them to be sold for $1,000, a little more than $1,000, so just about anyone can get one; certainly a terrorist intent on doing evil. so the ban takes on new urgency, and today there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the house of representatives has passed a bill to extend that ban for ten years. the bad news is the dangerous loophole i mentioned is still in the bill. under existing law, the law that expires tonight, you can make one of these undetectable guns perfectly legal by simply attaching a removable piece of metal to the handle, and then you could have the gun, have it be legal at the last moment when you wanted to slip it somewhere where it could be very dangerous, you remove the metal part and make the gun invisible to the metal det
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 2:40pm EST
that gap between inter-academe beginning and science is certainly sunlight. [inaudible] >> -- i mean -- jan mark [inaudible] [inaudible] [laughter] [inaudible] merrimac >> i want to talk about this being about publishing. suppose you abolished the phd dissertation, which i think would be a great idea. save a lot of trees -- but about treason anymore. save a lot of cybersomething. most people publish dissertation never published another thing again. it's not the mark of being a scholar necessarily for being a teacher. not all of us are book writers. even great writers had their distances. 3000 word people, marathon runners, sprinters. but those are the good writers. it's our talent for that. it's not till that way you can be talented. the second set would be -- how should i put it, constraint unoriginality, liveliness, i see that as someone who's never published a peer-reviewed article. i have tried. >> to have to go into this a bit more quiet the mac you understand why. yet five, six, seven, 10. it is a being like a purÉe of me and. so that's my contribution to that part. >> maybe one more
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 9:00am EST
and that would have meant more support for girls in math and science because they were not doing as well as boys at one time and we managed to close that gap, that would have meant helping boys despite everything else, reading, writing, school engagement, classroom comportment, pretty good research, teachers have a bias against unruly students. understandable but these students can be 5 or 6 years old. i don't know if it is something we want to blame the boys for or punish them for, we want to make a classroom happy place for the manned room for their personalities and high spiritedness. we haven't done a good enough job with that. >> host: is there a shortage of male teachers and does this have an effect if there is? >> guest: there are few male teachers in elementary school. you have slightly more in high school but still this is a slight exaggeration but one critic of the current school system said schools are run by women for girls. an overstatement not my much. a lot feel that way. researchers interviewed boys, why did you leave school? why did you drop out? one little boy said i thought no
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 2:30pm EST
to be taken care of. this isn't science fiction anymore. now, undetectable firearms have always been around since the days of world war ii. it was clearly a present danger. that's why in 19 both parties got together to pass it and it's been extended since then. but it is no longer science fiction that somebody can just make a gun in their basement, basically obliterating the utility of all of our nation's firearms laws and use it to perpetrate great evil throughout this cannes. -- throughout it country. 3-d printers cost only about $2,000 today. most futurists are pretty certain that in maybe a decade or more, most americans will have access to this technology, just like the photocopier and the personal computer seemed out of reach at some point for most middle-class americans. maybe today the 3-d printer is but in a decade or more it might just be another household appliance that sits right next to your computer printer. second, we know how dangerous plastic guns are, because people have tested this premise. one investigative journalist in israel took a plastic gun into the israeli parliam
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 10:00pm EST
. [applause] i think john has done well so i would say our political science students to accomplish this historical solar a uncelebrated author. his most recent book thomas jefferson rose to the coveted number one spot on the york times bestsellers list one of the best books of the year by the times book review and "washington post." the best-selling biography of andrew jackson earned a pulitzer prize says executive better it executive vice president of random house with a fascinating books with the influential reading less. with his expertise and engagement of the literary world to make it possible to bring exciting events to dash fill just like this book "the letters of arthur schlesinger, jr." just released a few days ago. i am proud to have jaundice by partner in this year's lecture series. tonight he has invited andrew and teeeighteen schlesinger did of their love to review over 35,000 letters written by their father the of the eight great arthur schlesinger, jr. to create this remarkable book. we're also welcoming tom brokaw back. [applause] he was honored when he delivered an
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 1:00am EST
and then expected to run early or start late networking events included the importance leven's like the science fair or the art show. kid rescheduled time to work out and see friends. fifth it even included time to create the next week's scheduled to people out of one half-hour slot and color-coded by category of work or kids impersonal and took the path of the refrigerator. the which filled me with the odd mixture of hope. i can do it all but not one moment to spare. on paper there was time for everything as long as nothing went wrong but of course, things did. lead car got a flat to of a friend called for a favored word though the water heater broca of flooded the floor with the isfahan happened it is like the butterfly yvette. is set off a chain of events setting awful whole schedule. but if one got sick all of us would then we would be stuck in the house missing sleep and school aaron to work in getting bored off of speeto cartoons. everything humanly possible. reject a legal titans. at the slightest hint of the cold idle doubt herbal remedies and homeopathic remedies that promise to boost abuse
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
. the science gives us great reason for optimism. there are currently more than 30 safe and effective antiviral drugs and drug combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making significant progress toward new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. with far fewer side effects. those regular min reduce the amount of hiv in the body. which helps people living with hiv stay healthy and live longer. and we also know from the nih funding research that hiv traps suggestion is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an infected person is reduced to undetectable leaflets. meanwhile partner agency at the fda has approved new rapid diagnostic test that can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv infected individuals who might not be tested in traditional health care settings. now as we speak, nih grant ees and scientists are exploring way to treat hiv infection by administrating hiv antibiotic. and they have begun early stage human testing of an antibody that was effective in producting human cells against more than
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 10:00pm EST
a doomsday science that wallows in pessimism. they recalled when they describe intelligence, he evokedded memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down in the river as a young nan, and he said he would get the basket still with pure milk, and the cow would relieve itself in the milk, and president johnson said the release, and he meant that in a bad way, that was intelligence. so you -- [laughter] you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] there's another metaphor that i hear, the famous comment that we, in the intelligence community, like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world an say we are at the cross roads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. we hope you policymakers will be able to have the wisdom to choose the right course. [laughter] in fact, in my experience and experience i think we relate today on the bulcans is it is when it works well, a collaborative enterprise with vast capabilities to bring to the fight, but also with clear limitations to be understood by leaders who know th
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 10:00am EST
of the way the transition system operates in the science cost and i'm concerned that under order 1,000, ferc is defining the benefits so broadly into spreading the cost so wisely that the simple action has no meaning anymore. chairwoman lafleur, please explain the idea of the beneficiary pay and what that should mean and keep in mind i don't want my constituents. i know you can't address the merits of the individual complaints filings under the 1,000 but there is a leave of the point i would like to raise with you that i think stands on its own which i hope you will be able to respond. >> thank you congressman. the order 1,000 required to plan cooperatively across the region as the region encompassing pennsylvania already does. and take into account three kinds of benefits. reliability benefits, which can be hard to quantify that are very real, the needing public policy requirements to connect to resources that the states require them to connect which are normally identified by the states such as pennsylvania which is a renewable portfolio standard, and a third congestion benefits to reduce
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
and sciences. a former director of the leon leavy center for buying agraph in new york. she teaches in the msa programs of the new school glover columbia university school of the arts and has taught sarah lawrence college and union college in new yorkie she was washington irving professor of modern literary. please welcome brenda wineapple and nathaniel philbrick. [applause] >> on my way over here, nathaniel and i talked about how both of these subjects are obviously the most -- among the most notable eras of american history. how could we characterize a comparative deal between your book and brenda's when it comes to intensity, and relevance, where both in the revolution and the civil war. there wasn't very much of a clear future in either era. >> i was thinking about this question when i heard about the great opportunity to be paired with brenda, and my bunker hill begins actually -- begins and ends with john quincy adams. it begins with him at seven years old, standing on a hill with his mother, then in her early 30s, on june 17, 1775, watching the battle of bunker hill from a hill about 12
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 12:00am EST
lover of science and philosophy so that was an early influence because raising me in california there were all sorts of influences but i had lessons and i took latin and french and i think we had a fight with the school system because with latin and spanish and french they said you can't take three language and my mother managed to turn this california school into a little prep school on the east coast. so a very strong influence on me. .. strong influence postmark before we go to call, how did you end up at the american enterprise university? >> guest: once i was on tenure, i went on a ship that went around the world and it's about 30 professors in the wonderful program. i was friends with all of them. i liked all of the teachers but they were certainly didn't radical. it was marxist, and this was in 1988. the soviet union was intact and yugoslavia was celebrated as a model society. so long story short i came off the ship and wrote an essay called the professor at sea. especially since it was so colorful. teaching these young women that they were oppressed and again, i found it
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 12:00pm EST
never told us very much. she's also a senior fellow for science and international affairs committee member of the policy board. she cofounded the center for the new american security think tank that you all know and she is a member of the aspen strategy group. so, zelikow is a professor of history at the university of virginia and is also the dean leading the graduate school of arts and sciences. >> i'm going to put that on my resume. i like that. soon after they became a trial and appellate lawyer in texas doing for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am EST
hope we can take the visiting off pretty soon. [laughter] i would say that our political science students are just thrilled to have such a unique opportunity to learn from this accomplished historical scholar and celebrated to have. john's most recent book, "thomas jefferson: the art of power," rose to the coveted number one spot on "the new york times" bestseller list and was selected as one of the best books of the year by the times book review and the be washington post. and "the washington post." his best selling biography of andrew jackson, "american lion," earned him a pulitzer prize. as executive vice president of random house john, as you might expect, is involved in the creation and publication of fascinating books that top the most interesting and influential reading lists. his passion for learning, discovery, his exper or tease and his engagement in the literary world also benefit the university greatly by making it possible for us to bring exciting events to nashville like this talk based on the letters of arthur schlessinger jr. i am proud to have john as my partner
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 11:00pm EST
basically met at a science fair in london, the delegates, and met a young canadian women, 16. we met at the hospital. and i had taken a year off between high-school going to oxford. i would visitor. so i worked, you know, oddly enough in north london. oftentimes. to earn enough money to go and see her. i arrived in montreal in the early 1952. and then after a little while there was this huge continent beyond. so my parents dismayed when they learned about it, hitchhiking to vancouver. not a very long time, people were very nice. some dispatch. and then i decided to go and have a look at america. been fascinated by any english child, the cisco kid and champion and all of those kinds of programs. so i entered the united states. the time of blame in washington state. the first time i remember seeing , the incident as its i looked bewildered. stopped and picked me up. so would you like to come to seattle. that was the beginning of a series of unbelievable things which -- i visited every single state in the union, well, at least a lie, everyone in the continental u.s. i traveled -- i thin
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 10:05pm EST
. and there is a system called regenerative medicine and it's almost like science fiction. it is when they take your cells and they grow a large number of them and then they take the 3-d printing in the most recent version and they print out the organ that you need. if they need a kidney, they can print that out. it was headed by a woman doctor whose specialty is growing heart and you will see in a few years -- you remember the young lady that had a hard time getting a lung transplant? ten years from now if we are smart, if we encourage this, there will be no waiting lines. you will replant yourself. it turns out the you don't reject you. so this is very important. what means is that you don't take any of those antirejection medicines. so you lower the cost and you increase the likelihood of success and you eliminate the waiting lists and you have a different world. the number one problem is the food and drug administration and virtually everyone i've talked to have said that this includes china, japan, india, because of this food and drug administration, this is hopeless. what we talk about is that pione
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 10:00am EST
in ottawa. general lawson graduated from the military college of canada with a bachelor of science degree as well as a master of science in the electrical can engineering and while attending the u.s. armed forces command staff college in montgomery, alabama, he completed a masters of public administration in at auburn. so he's thoroughly educated, i think it's fair to say. drawing on that record of service and expertise, general lawson has agreed to share his thoughts on the u.s./canadian defense relationship. secretary hagel just last week called this relationship one of the strongest in the world and, indeed, our canadian friends have fought alongside american troops in the volatile kandahar province in afghanistan at the height of the conflict, and they continue to deploy some 950 troops this a training capacity near kabul. just this past friday, they signed the canada/u.s. asia-pacific cooperation framework to increase our security cooperation in this important region. this will be done in the framework of the canada/u.s. joint board of defense. this is the context in which general la
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 12:00pm EST
, a not-for-profit think tank in the washington dc area that focuses on the issues of science and technology and how science and technology is changing our society for almost 17 years now we have been the host at home for the international terrorism studies have it up by professor yonah alexander and i think most people here would agree and understand that the center that yonah heads up is one of the most for most academic institutions and consortium of institutions in the world focusing on all aspects of terrorism. professor alexander blank group has looked up, studied and published documents on every conceivable realm and aspect of terrorism for many, many years and is personally and author of over 100 books on the subject and we are quite proud here at the potomac institute could be the home of his academic efforts. we are also privileged to partner with the international law institute and representing them as he always has and is the chairman of the international institute and for well over a decade we have partnered with professor wallace to bring to you these seminars an
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
in the head of the american federation of teachers spoke with reporters at the christian science monitor. here is a bit of what she had to say. >> today is like the day after pizza they. so i'm sure that most of you filed some stories about pisa and the sky falling in things like that although i haven't actually seen much of that. actually, a lot of really good reporting under the numbers and i just want to thank all of you for that. and, you know, we have been through this before. this is the third or fourth time, the fourth time in my memory, but the fourth or the fifth time that pisa results have invested in the united states. but what does this say that the united states is pretty much in the middle of the pack on mathematics, science and english and particularly this year where there was a focus on mathematics for the first time in ten years. it says two or three things. number one, it says that things like poverty, social economics really matter because you look at the states like massachusetts and connecticut that did well and what they've done and you look at the data when you pull it
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm EST
is an cozy a syt four and six sick science in the kumble justice system. from colorado springs colorado, this is an hour and a half. >> with experience with the microphone -- okay. how's this? great. good morning everyone. it's a pleasure to be here today i would like to thank the organizers for inviting me to come to this beautiful place i would like to talk with you this morning at hank mentioned we would start with a very basic review of dna. what is dna, how does it work and why should you be interested in it. our focus on an important intersection between the dna and the law and that isn' is a diffe of genetics, genetics conference of applications and illustrate some of the points that with the case studies in which the dna has been used in for the context. so, our body is a marvelous collection of about 100 trillion cells. and inside almost all of these cells in the nucleus of the cell's here we can find dna. the dna is organized among chromosomes. we absorb these under a microscope and if we look three closely at these chromosomes, we see this double helix structure, the classic
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 10:00am EST
of the social sciences research network. the third witness is simon lazarus senior counsel with the accountability center. he's a member of the administrative conference of the united states and during his career he served as the public policy counsel for the national senior citizens law center as a partner at powell goldstein and associate director of president carter white house domestic policy staff. mr. lazarus has written articles that appeared in journals as well as publications such as the atlantic, the "washington post" and the new republic. our final witness is michael cannon of the health policy studies. he has been recognized as an influential expert on the affordable care act. mr. cannon has appeared on abc, cbs, cnn and fox news and has written articles that have been featured in numerous newspapers including "the wall street journal," usa today and the "los angeles times." he is also the coeditor of a book on replacing the portable care act and the co-author of a book on healthcare reform. i would like to thank all of the witnesses today. each of the written s
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 2:00am EST
by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year effort that's going to be there and i would say we look at mechanisms to assist her in her step in responding over the longer-term in assisting filipinas and developing. i will say it has been mentioned before, the filipino community has been quick to respond. it varies billion, very proud people and caring people and the government now is winding up in moving forward. recent leadership from the u.s., which i think they would welcome, they would be positioned well for the future. thank you. >> thank you so very much for the tremendous job catholic relief services is doing. we were fully briefed by joe curry while we were there and tom o'reilly took his bitterly around. we got to see the operation upfront and was extremely imp
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 2:00pm EST
do to the our economy, secure life. with a look at this as a very real threat. no matter how science fiction it is to think about that happening. it could easily happen. it's our job to stop it. >> host: representative hunter, iran has not ended and f the country for more than 200 just. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries do proxy terrorist the they're in syria, ma lebanon. they are in a lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. so they haven't invaded because that's not what these countries do. what these countries do is when i say countries, countries like afghanistan, prewar, and iran, they have proxy care. they fund, promote and train at actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries. >> host: front page of "the new york times," i don't know if you saw this story. jihadists groups gain internal across the middle peace. >> guest: that's true. in fact, iraq and syria, ma especially because what you have is this. you have a rat line from syr
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 3:55pm EST
science him to do a series of commentaries for all things considered at which point the philadelphia of patrolmen's benevolent association said enough is enough. we have a widow who was killed by this man now doing things on npr? that was not a violation but that is the nature of the beast. they finally got the message and canceled the commentary so that is how they work historically that discarding in the soviet union moving to the united states even after it expires the playbook lives on. they know how to agitate and propaganda. agi-prop. but day counted on something in that stage is to presuming the guilty innocence stage. in detail like the andy griffith show but now the rise from a particular 67 episode which some of you have seen. to remember when aunt bee is the juror. do remember the guy on trial? the actor? jack nicholson. 1967 a few years later he would be a movie star but he is on trial for what vinegar's restore 12 people on the jury one was aunt bee the other 11 are convinced the character is guilty but aunt bee pulled out because he does not seem like the kind of guy to
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:45am EST
called regenerative medicine which is almost like science fiction. regenerative medicine is when they take your cells and they grow a large number of them. and they then take 3-d printing in the most recent version, and they print out the organ you need. so if you need a kidney, they can print out a kidney. if you need a heart, they can print out a heart. the texas regenerative medicine institute is headed by a woman doctor whose specialty is growing hearts. and you'll see in a few years remember the young lady who had a hard time getting a lung transplant because she was too young and the bureaucratic rules didn't work? ten years from now, if we're smart, if we encourage this, ten years from now there'll be no waiting lines, because you won't transplant. you will replant yourself. and it turns out you don't reject you. so the net effect -- this is very important. what it means is you don't take any of those antirejection medicines. so you radically lower the cost, you dramatically increase the likelihood of success, you eliminate waiting lists. it's a different world. number one
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 2:00pm EST
is a sort of doomsday science that wobbles and pessimism. i recall the famous statement by president lyndon johnson when he described intelligence, he developed the memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down at the river as a young man, and he said he would get the bucket filled with pure milk and then the cat would relieve itself in the milk. and president johnson said the relief -- and he met relief in the bad way -- that was intelligence. [laughter] so you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] but there is another metaphor that i often hear and that is the famous woody allen comment that we in the intelligence community like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world and say, we are at a crossroads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. [laughter] and we hope you policymakers would be able to the wisdom to choose the right course. but, in fact, in my experience and the spirits i think we're going to relate today on the balkans is that intelligence is, when it works well, a collaborative ent
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 8:00am EST
are the aol and compuserve in this story. now that said, it's actually quite a difficult computer science challenge to build a distributed social system that works in a timely manner. and we know this because it used to exist. net news, if anyone was using the internet in the 1990s, they'll remember that. and, essentially, it was a social media discussion system that was based on open standards. but it was rather slow, and it quickly became rather unwieldily. the volume of traffic passing through it was really too big, and a lot of isps didn't want to get involved with it. there's clearly a lot of technical challenges that would need to be overcome for this to happen. but i'm keeping a very close eye on efforts like dias pa -- diaspora. there seems to be a new one every few months to create an open standard for social networking. the same could happen to to facebook and twitter in the next decade. >> host: but whatever form social media takes in the future, you write, one thing is clear, it is not going away as this book has argued. social media is not new. it has been around for centurie
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 12:00pm EST
is a better term, and industry science-based? >> i appreciate that question a great deal. the answer is we have put in place a number of new policy components that will begin to allow us to cover the entire. and it. i don't think we'll ever find the time when the american health sector diminishes in terms of imports and its reliance on technology. we are technologically driven in this country and that is a great asset in many respects, but a liability as well. it is an asset in that we've allowed the most technological means to be used in some cases that it made a difference. some people confuse our technology with our system, our marketplace. we have the best in the world. but we don't have the best sector in the world if you look at any performance criteria. i think we're the best technology in the world. a lot of people around the world want to access that technology. succumb to the united states to be able to do that. but what this law does and what i think a growing consensus, even in the private sector outside the law acknowledges that if we are really going to make a difference in t
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 6:00pm EST
do to a security wise. we have to look at this is a very real threat no matter how science fiction does to think about that happening. it could easily happen and it's our job to stop it. >> colon the gene tweets in represented hunter iran has not invaded another country for more than 200 years. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries through proxy terrorists. they are in a whole lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan so they haven't invaded because that is not with these countries do. with these countries do is end when i say countries i'm in countries like afghanistan prewar and iran have proxy wars and a fund to promote and train bad actors in their state bad bad actors in their state and send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries and kill and maim people. husk of the front page of "the new york times" and don't know if you saw this story. groups gain in turmoil across the mideast. violence has presented new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 8:00am EST
does it say that the united states is pretty much in the middle of the pack on mathematics, science and english? and particularly this year where there was a real focus on mathematics for the first time in ten years. it says two or three things. number one, it says that things like poverty, socioeconomics really matter because you look at the states like massachusetts and connecticut that did well and what they've done, and you look at the data when you pull it out and try to account for poverty, and you see where the statistics are. but there's more to this, because if you just stop there, we're in the inane debate that we've been in for the last 20 years. be because th issue is not whether poverty matters, but what do we do about it? so the dominant strategying with, educational -- strategy, educational strategy that we've done about it for the last ten years is no child left behind and race to the top. there's been a wunsch of other thing -- bunch of other things like charters and competition and now new standards, but that's the hypertesting, the sanctioning of teachers, the clo
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 8:00am EST
point. it's protruding new coal-fired generation in this country spent the science that tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing. and about the state of florida where now taxpayers will have to invest and are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bills, the bills that come to every time have an extreme weather event, whether it's drought or super storms. and i would think that the utility industry also sees the writing on the wall, they're looking for the certainty and the more aggressive we are moving away from carbon intensive energy generation, the better. thank you very much. ..e gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> chairman lafleur, perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the various constituents. currently a lot of it has to be shipped. a lot of it is being wasted which is a shame. that doesn't benefit the consumer and doesn't help the environment any. my question is what i am h
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm EST
. >> the science and the economics as well tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing you think about the state of florida where now the tax payers have to invest in are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bill, the bills that come due every time we have an extreme weather events whether it is a drought or super storm. i would think that utility industry also sees the writing on the wall if they are looking for that certainty and the more aggressive we are on moving away from the carbon intensive energy generation, the better. >> the gentle ease time is expired. this time recognize the gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. chairman lafleur perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the production of the various constituents with ngl that we can't use this as only the local market. it has to be shipped. currently a lot of it is just wasted which is a shame and doesn't ben
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 1:30pm EST
't believe that, but science, he paused, the immediate contingency overtook him, pull some back from the edge of the theoretical abyss. i made a small investigation of this fellow, he continued. i could have gone deeper if i had known. do you mean you have been to a medium, in quired jr. humorously? he stared and laughed. a medium. about gets the? no, i haven't. i set up making the small investigation of his past. and you found he was an oxford man? an oxford man, he was incredulous. he wears a pink suit. nevertheless he is an oxford man. oxford, new mexico. daisy invited him. in new him before we were married from god knows where. we were all irritable and aware of it as we drove into the silence. then as dr. t. j. elbert's faded guys came into sight down the road remembered get the's caution about gasoline. we have enough to get as into town, said tom. there is a garage right there. i don't want to get stalled out in this baking heat. tom through on the brakes in patiently and as we slid to an abrupt dusty stop under wilson's sign after a moment the proprietor emerged from the interior of t
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 2:00am EST
with science, being in an environment like this where i could explore whatever i could become passionate about. it was a fantastic opportunity. it actually got me out of clinical research and ultimately into doing more basic neuroscience . i spent 20 years looking at the doing thats -- research. and i came back to the nih. host: we have a call from missouri. good morning. caller: thank you for c-span. i finished two books by caroline leaf. i do not know whether she is a psychologist or psychiatrist. but her books are on thoughts and what enters the brain. i just find it really hard to stay with this problem because i have got a lot of problems with hate. and all of the information i see on television seems to be trytive information, and i to eliminate all of that. but it is almost impossible. all the wars. i mean, i am so happy that you have this program on this morning. i am going to hang up and listen to the program. thank you very much. host: thank you for the call. guest: by the way, i would like to make one remark. i am so delighted to have you here at nih. but i would not want your viewe
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